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Trial registered on ANZCTR


Registration number
ACTRN12618000444280
Ethics application status
Approved
Date submitted
18/03/2018
Date registered
28/03/2018
Date last updated
4/03/2019
Date data sharing statement initially provided
4/03/2019
Date results information initially provided
4/03/2019
Type of registration
Prospectively registered

Titles & IDs
Public title
Learning successfully for study and life ("Life"): Teaching gifted young adolescents about minimising the impact of perfectionism on successful learning.
Scientific title
Learning successfully for study and life ("Life"): Teaching gifted young adolescents about minimising the impact of perfectionism on successful learning.
Secondary ID [1] 294370 0
Nil known
Universal Trial Number (UTN)
U1111-1211-0513
Trial acronym
Linked study record

Health condition
Health condition(s) or problem(s) studied:
Depression 307099 0
Anxiety 307100 0
Psychological Wellbeing 307101 0
Perfectionism 307102 0
Condition category
Condition code
Mental Health 306210 306210 0 0
Anxiety
Mental Health 306211 306211 0 0
Depression

Intervention/exposure
Study type
Interventional
Description of intervention(s) / exposure
A 3 session perfectionism programme "LIFE" will be delivered weekly to Year 8 students (Mean age 13.5) who are in a gifted stream at an Adelaide public secondary school.
Lesson duration is 50 minutes, delivered face to face to students in their usual classroom by external facilitators (postgraduate psychology students)., with their usual classroom teacher also present. Lesson format consists of short oral or video presentations on key concepts, together with group discussion and worksheets to apply ideas to real life scenarios. Lesson 1 covers unhelpful perfectionism versus the pursuit of excellence, lesson 2 looks at good learning (taking time out will improve your performance; making mistakes and failing is an essential part of success; celebration of success), and lesson 3 focuses on self-compassion: How to respond to when things don’t go so well.
Intervention code [1] 300673 0
Prevention
Intervention code [2] 300674 0
Treatment: Other
Comparator / control treatment
Waitlist control - students will undertake lessons as usual before receiving the LIFE programme after 3 month follow-up data is collected
Control group
Active

Outcomes
Primary outcome [1] 305221 0
Perfectionism (Almost Perfect Scale - Revised)
Timepoint [1] 305221 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline (primary endpoint).
Secondary outcome [1] 344532 0
Academic motivation (Academic motivation scale)
Timepoint [1] 344532 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline
Secondary outcome [2] 344533 0
Academic satisfaction (one item VAS)
Timepoint [2] 344533 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline
Secondary outcome [3] 344534 0
Anxiety (DASS-21 subscale)
Timepoint [3] 344534 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline
Secondary outcome [4] 344535 0
Self compassion (Self-compassion scale - short form)
Timepoint [4] 344535 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline
Secondary outcome [5] 344546 0
Depression (DASS-21 subscale)
Timepoint [5] 344546 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline
Secondary outcome [6] 344547 0
Wellbeing (Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale)
Timepoint [6] 344547 0
One week prior to the intervention, one week post intervention, 3 months after the baseline

Eligibility
Key inclusion criteria
Enrolled in a selected school in Year 8 (Gifted stream) with passive consent from parent and active assent from student
Minimum age
12 Years
Maximum age
15 Years
Gender
Both males and females
Can healthy volunteers participate?
Yes
Key exclusion criteria
Nil

Study design
Purpose of the study
Prevention
Allocation to intervention
Randomised controlled trial
Procedure for enrolling a subject and allocating the treatment (allocation concealment procedures)
No. Schools will nominate pairs of classes to take part which will then be randomly allocated to intervention/control groups offsite by the primary researcher
Methods used to generate the sequence in which subjects will be randomised (sequence generation)
Excel randomisation with a priori rules regarding allocation
Masking / blinding
Open (masking not used)
Who is / are masked / blinded?



Intervention assignment
Single group
Other design features
Phase
Not Applicable
Type of endpoint(s)
Statistical methods / analysis
Power analysis shows that to detect a Cohen's d effect size of 0.30 with a power level of 0.80, and attition of 5% at each time point, 110 participants per group are required (Hedeker, Gibbons, & Waternaux, 1999). This pilot study will therefore not be fully powered, as 50 participants per group are available within school constraints. Data will be analysed via Linear Mixed Modelling, adjusting for baseline levels of each outcome variable.

Recruitment
Recruitment status
Completed
Date of first participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last data collection
Anticipated
Actual
Sample size
Target
Accrual to date
Final
Recruitment in Australia
Recruitment state(s)
SA
Recruitment postcode(s) [1] 22092 0
5064 - Glenunga

Funding & Sponsors
Funding source category [1] 299011 0
University
Name [1] 299011 0
Flinders University
Address [1] 299011 0
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide SA 5001
Country [1] 299011 0
Australia
Primary sponsor type
University
Name
Flinders University
Address
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide SA 5001
Country
Australia
Secondary sponsor category [1] 298237 0
None
Name [1] 298237 0
Address [1] 298237 0
Country [1] 298237 0

Ethics approval
Ethics application status
Approved
Ethics committee name [1] 299948 0
Social and Behavioural Sciences Research Ethics Committee, Flinders University
Ethics committee address [1] 299948 0
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide SA 5001
Ethics committee country [1] 299948 0
Australia
Date submitted for ethics approval [1] 299948 0
15/01/2018
Approval date [1] 299948 0
23/03/2018
Ethics approval number [1] 299948 0
7901
Ethics committee name [2] 299949 0
SA Department of Education and Child Development
Ethics committee address [2] 299949 0
Level 8, 31 Flinders Street
Adelaide SA 5000
Ethics committee country [2] 299949 0
Australia
Date submitted for ethics approval [2] 299949 0
16/01/2018
Approval date [2] 299949 0
27/03/2018
Ethics approval number [2] 299949 0
2018-0003

Summary
Brief summary
This study builds on pilot work testing 2- and 3-session perfectionism programmes with early adolescents which found improvements in emotional problems, self-imposed perfectionistic standards (sustained at 4-week follow-up), and well-being, sustained at 3-month follow-up (Fairweather-Schmidt and Wade, 2015; Vekas & Wade, 2017). The modified programme for the current research expands the pilot programme to include an emphasis on the difference in pursuing excellence and pursuing perfection, as gifted students will be offered the intervention. To date no research has examined whether perfectionism interventions can increase intrinsic motivation and academic goal progress.

Research objectives
1. To examine the impact of the LIFE curriculum on primary (perfectionism) and secondary (anxiety, depression, wellbeing, self-compassion, academic motivation and satisfaction).
2. To test whether improvements in certain outcome factors (anxiety, depression, well-being, academic motivation and satisfaction) are mediated by the following outcome factors: self-compassion and perfectionism.

We hypothesize that the intervention group will experience significantly greater decreases in perfectionism, anxiety, and depression, and significantly greater increases in wellbeing, self-compassion, academic motivation and satisfaction, at follow-up. We also hypothesize that decreases in perfectionism and increases in self-compassion between baseline and end of treatment will mediate the association between group and follow-up changes in anxiety, depression, well-being, academic motivation and satisfaction.
Trial website
Trial related presentations / publications
Public notes

Contacts
Principal investigator
Name 82050 0
Prof Tracey Wade
Address 82050 0
College of Education, Psychology & Social Work
Flinders University
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide SA 5001
Country 82050 0
Australia
Phone 82050 0
+618 8201 3736
Fax 82050 0
Email 82050 0
tracey.wade@flinders.edu.au
Contact person for public queries
Name 82051 0
Prof Tracey Wade
Address 82051 0
College of Education, Psychology & Social Work
Flinders University
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide SA 5001
Country 82051 0
Australia
Phone 82051 0
+618 8201 3736
Fax 82051 0
Email 82051 0
tracey.wade@flinders.edu.au
Contact person for scientific queries
Name 82052 0
Prof Tracey Wade
Address 82052 0
College of Education, Psychology & Social Work
Flinders University
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide SA 5001
Country 82052 0
Australia
Phone 82052 0
+618 8201 3736
Fax 82052 0
Email 82052 0
tracey.wade@flinders.edu.au

Data sharing statement
Will individual participant data (IPD) for this trial be available (including data dictionaries)?
No
No/undecided IPD sharing reason/comment
sensitivity of children's data
What supporting documents are/will be available?
No other documents available
Summary results
Have study results been published in a peer-reviewed journal?
No
Other publications
Have study results been made publicly available in another format?
No
Results – plain English summary
The purpose of this study was to evaluate a 3-lesson perfectionism module in young gifted adolescents, designed to decrease unhelpful perfectionism while not impacting on healthy striving for high personal standards. Year 8 gifted students (n=93, mean age =13.59) were randomized to receive the perfectionism module (n=46) or classes as usual (n=47). We additionally examined the impact of the module on well-being, self-compassion, academic motivation and negative affect, at both post-intervention and 3-month follow-up. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models adjusting for baseline observation and age.
At post-intervention small between group effect sizes were obtained for discrepancy, self-compassion and negative affect, favoring the intervention group, but the commensurate effect size for high standards was negligible. At 3-month follow-up, self-compassion retained a small between group effect size favoring the intervention group. This study suggest that the intervention impacts unhelpful perfectionism without affecting high standards and improves self-compassion. Further development and evaluation of this program will inform us whether it can assist gifted children in avoiding burnout while improving engagement with academic goals.