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Trial details imported from ClinicalTrials.gov

For full trial details, please see the original record at https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01551160




Registration number
NCT01551160
Ethics application status
Date submitted
4/03/2012
Date registered
12/03/2012
Date last updated
25/11/2016

Titles & IDs
Public title
Impact of a Communication and Team-working Intervention on Performance and Effectiveness of a Medical Emergency Team
Scientific title
Impact of a Communication and Team-working Intervention on Performance and Effectiveness of a Medical Emergency Team
Secondary ID [1] 0 0
RPC1001
Universal Trial Number (UTN)
Trial acronym
IMPACT
Linked study record

Health condition
Health condition(s) or problem(s) studied:
Hospital Rapid Response Team 0 0
Condition category
Condition code

Intervention/exposure
Study type
Interventional
Description of intervention(s) / exposure
Other interventions - A communication and team-working intervention

Experimental: Medical Emergency Team - A communication and team-working initiative


Other interventions: A communication and team-working intervention
Medical Emergency Team (MET) briefings and formalised handover between MET staff and patient care teams

Intervention code [1] 0 0
Other interventions
Comparator / control treatment
Control group

Outcomes
Primary outcome [1] 0 0
Multiple Medical Emergency Team calls per patient admission
Timepoint [1] 0 0
Measured at time of hospital discharge
Secondary outcome [1] 0 0
Mortality
Timepoint [1] 0 0
At time of hospital discharge
Secondary outcome [2] 0 0
Mortality
Timepoint [2] 0 0
At completion of Medical Emergency Team call
Secondary outcome [3] 0 0
ICU admission rate
Timepoint [3] 0 0
At completion of Medical Emergency Team call
Secondary outcome [4] 0 0
ICU interventions
Timepoint [4] 0 0
At completion of Medical Emergency Team call

Eligibility
Key inclusion criteria
Inclusions

- Medical Emergency Team (MET) calls
Minimum age
18 Years
Maximum age
No limit
Gender
Both males and females
Can healthy volunteers participate?
No
Key exclusion criteria
- Cancellation of the MET response prior to, or on arrival at, the location of
activation

- Calls to patients < 18 years of age

Study design
Purpose of the study
Health Services Research
Allocation to intervention
N/A
Procedure for enrolling a subject and allocating the treatment (allocation concealment procedures)
Methods used to generate the sequence in which subjects will be randomised (sequence generation)
Masking / blinding
Open (masking not used)
Who is / are masked / blinded?



Intervention assignment
Single group
Other design features
Phase
Not Applicable
Type of endpoint(s)
Statistical methods / analysis

Recruitment
Recruitment status
Completed
Data analysis
Reason for early stopping/withdrawal
Other reasons
Date of first participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last data collection
Anticipated
Actual
Sample size
Target
Accrual to date
Final
Recruitment in Australia
Recruitment state(s)
SA
Recruitment hospital [1] 0 0
Lyell McEwin Hospital - Elizabeth Vale
Recruitment postcode(s) [1] 0 0
5112 - Elizabeth Vale

Funding & Sponsors
Primary sponsor type
Other
Name
Lyell McEwin Hospital
Address
Country
Other collaborator category [1] 0 0
Other
Name [1] 0 0
University of Adelaide
Address [1] 0 0
Country [1] 0 0

Ethics approval
Ethics application status

Summary
Brief summary
Patients in hospital can have unexpected clinical emergencies. When this occurs the Medical
Emergency Team (MET) are called with the intention of resolving the problem. Previous
investigations have found that patients who have more than one call during their admission
have worse outcomes than patients who only have one call. But it has not been established
why.

The aim of this research will be to examine these repeated calls and why patients subject to
them go on to have worse outcomes. A predictive model will be developed to identify potential
sources of risk. One potential source is poor communication between health care providers. An
intervention to improve communication around MET calls may provide benefit to patients and
improve outcomes.
Trial website
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01551160
Trial related presentations / publications
Chalwin RP, Flabouris A. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams. Intern Med J. 2013 Sep;43(9):962-9. doi: 10.1111/imj.12172. Review.
Public notes

Contacts
Principal investigator
Name 0 0
Richard Chalwin, FCICM
Address 0 0
Lyell McEwin Hospital
Country 0 0
Phone 0 0
Fax 0 0
Email 0 0
Contact person for public queries
Name 0 0
Address 0 0
Country 0 0
Phone 0 0
Fax 0 0
Email 0 0
Contact person for scientific queries

Summary results
Other publications