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Trial details imported from ClinicalTrials.gov

For full trial details, please see the original record at https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00438061




Registration number
NCT00438061
Ethics application status
Date submitted
20/02/2007
Date registered
21/02/2007
Date last updated
26/02/2007

Titles & IDs
Public title
Effect of Abdominal Obesity on Lipoprotein Metabolism
Scientific title
Effect of Weight Loss on Lipoprotein Metabolism in Abdominal Obesity
Secondary ID [1] 0 0
EC-256
Universal Trial Number (UTN)
Trial acronym
Linked study record

Health condition
Health condition(s) or problem(s) studied:
Obesity 0 0
Dyslipidemia 0 0
Insulin Resistance 0 0
Condition category
Condition code
Diet and Nutrition 0 0 0 0
Obesity
Metabolic and Endocrine 0 0 0 0
Other metabolic disorders
Cardiovascular 0 0 0 0
Other cardiovascular diseases
Blood 0 0 0 0
Other blood disorders

Intervention/exposure
Study type
Interventional
Description of intervention(s) / exposure
Behaviour - Weight loss by dietary restriction

Behaviour: Weight loss by dietary restriction


Intervention code [1] 0 0
Behaviour
Comparator / control treatment
Control group

Outcomes
Primary outcome [1] 0 0
Primary: Fractional catabolic and production rates of LDL-apoB and HDL-apoA-I (before and after 16 week treatments)
Timepoint [1] 0 0
Secondary outcome [1] 0 0
Secondary: Cholesterol; Triglyceride; LDL-cholesterol; Adipocytokines; Genetic polymorphism
Timepoint [1] 0 0

Eligibility
Key inclusion criteria
- Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) >28kg/m2 and visceral visceral obesity
(waist to hip ratio> 1.0 or waist circumference >100 cm)
Minimum age
18 Years
Maximum age
65 Years
Gender
Males
Can healthy volunteers participate?
Yes
Key exclusion criteria
- Diabetes mellitus,

- Proteinuria,

- Hypothyroidism,

- Abnormal liver enzymes,

- Major systemic illness,

- A history of alcohol abuse,

- A family history of hyperlipidemia or premature coronary artery disease or were taking
medication known to affect lipid metabolism.

Study design
Purpose of the study
Treatment
Allocation to intervention
Randomised controlled trial
Procedure for enrolling a subject and allocating the treatment (allocation concealment procedures)
Methods used to generate the sequence in which subjects will be randomised (sequence generation)
Masking / blinding
Open (masking not used)
Who is / are masked / blinded?



Intervention assignment
Parallel
Other design features
Phase
Phase 3
Type of endpoint(s)
Statistical methods / analysis

Recruitment
Recruitment status
Completed
Data analysis
Reason for early stopping/withdrawal
Other reasons
Date of first participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last participant enrolment
Anticipated
Actual
Date of last data collection
Anticipated
Actual
Sample size
Target
Accrual to date
Final
Recruitment in Australia
Recruitment state(s)
WA
Recruitment hospital [1] 0 0
Royal Perth Hospital - Perth
Recruitment postcode(s) [1] 0 0
6000 - Perth

Funding & Sponsors
Primary sponsor type
Other
Name
The University of Western Australia
Address
Country

Ethics approval
Ethics application status

Summary
Brief summary
Abdominal obesity is strongly associated with dyslipidemia, which may account for the
associated increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary disease. Weight reduction is
suggested to be a preferred and effective first-line strategy to correct lipid abnormalities,
particularly in overweight/obese subjects. This improvement may be related to the effect of
reduction in abdominal fat mass on apoB and apoA-I metabolism, but this remains to be fully
demonstrated.

Hypothesis: Reduction in abdominal fat mass by weight loss decreases apoB concentration and
raises HDL-cholesterol chiefly by increasing LDL-apoB fractional catabolic rate (FCR), as
well as decreasing HDL apoA-I, respectively.
Trial website
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00438061
Trial related presentations / publications
Public notes

Contacts
Principal investigator
Name 0 0
Dick C Chan, PhD
Address 0 0
The University of Western Australia
Country 0 0
Phone 0 0
Fax 0 0
Email 0 0
Contact person for public queries
Name 0 0
Address 0 0
Country 0 0
Phone 0 0
Fax 0 0
Email 0 0
Contact person for scientific queries

Summary results
Other publications